Principal Investigator

Professor Oliver M. O'Reilly

Contact: oreilly@berkeley.edu

Biography   CV   Faculty Page

Oliver M. O’Reilly is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. He received his B.E. in Mechanical Engineering from the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG). Subsequently, he received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from Cornell University. At Cornell, he studied under Phil Holmes and Frank Moon. After spending two years as a postdoc at the Institut für Mechanik at ETH-Zürich under Jürg Dual, he joined the faculty in Mechanical Engineering at Cal. His interests span the fields of continuum mechanics and nonlinear dynamics. He has a broad range of specializations including directed (or Cosserat) theories of deformable bodies, constrained rigid body dynamics, contact mechanics, linear and nonlinear vibrations and linear and nonlinear dynamics of deformable bodies. He has applied these interests to a range of applications including MEMS resonators, brake squeal, the dynamics of toys, motorcycle navigation, axially moving media, artificial and natural satellites, spinal kinematics and vehicle collision dynamics. O’Reilly has published over 70 archival journal articles, written two books and is a co-inventor on two patents. He has also received several teaching awards including U.C. Berkeley's Distinguished Teaching Award in 1999, the Pi-Tau-Sigma Professor of the Year Award in 2003 and the Tau-Beta-Pi Outstanding Faculty of the Year Award in 2013.

Post-Docs

Kristin de Payrebrune

Contact: kristin.payrebrune@berkeley.edu

Kristin de Payrebrune received her M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Leibniz Universität Hannover in Germany in 2007. For her Ph.D. studies at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany, she worked on analysis and modeling of process-machine interaction in tool grinding, and received her degree in 2013. She started work as a research scholar in 2014 on modeling and manufacturing of climbing soft robots at the University of California at Berkeley. Kristin’s broader research interests lie in the modeling, analysis, and understanding of dynamical phenomena, particularly where related to discrete element or contact problems.

Graduate Students

Christopher Daily-Diamond

Contact: cadailydiamond@berkeley.edu

Christopher Daily-Diamond received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley in 2011 and his M.S. in 2013 from the same institution. He is pursuing his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering and is currently a Ph.D. candidate. Currently he investigates the competing effects of inertia and impact in the untying of nonsimple forced knots; in addition, he is studying numerical locomotion, mechanics, and characterization of SMA based soft robots. His past research involved development of a novel ocean wave energy collector (WEC) design that utilized phase dependant added mass effects. His interests include nonlinear dynamical systems, ocean related power generation, vibrational energy harvesting, biological kinematics, and basically any stimulating dynamical system.

Paul Drazin

Contact: pdrazin@berkeley.edu

Paul Drazin received his B.S. degree in Engineering Physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 2012 and his M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2013, also from UC Berkeley. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering. His research currently involves the development and analysis of an advanced, nonlinear model of the Friction Triple Pendulum, a seismic isolation device for buildings and other structures. His research has also included the development of theoretical dynamics and errors of real-time Hybrid Simulation with an emphasis on nonlinear systems and large multi-degree of freedom systems such as pendulums and crane structures. His interests include the modeling and analysis of theoretical dynamical systems. He has been awarded the 2016 Graduate Division Summer Grant and 2015 Summer Graduate Division Block Grant.

Evan Hemingway

Contact: evanhem@berkeley.edu

Evan Hemingway received his B.S. degree in Engineering Science and Mechanics from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2014 and his M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley in 2016. He is currently also pursuing a Ph.D. at UC Berkeley. His current research includes studying the relation between physical singularities in systems of interconnected rigid bodies and the mathematical singularities associated with coordinate representations of rotation tensors. He also enjoys teaching concepts in mechanics and physics to students at all levels. Evan is the recipient of the Berkeley Fellowship for Graduate Study and the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

Hyung-Taek Kim

Contact: htkim@berkeley.edu

Hyung-Taek Kim received his B.S. degree in Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering from Seoul National University (SNU), South Korea in 2004 and his M.S in 2006 from the same institution. Since 2006, he has been working for Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) as a research engineer. Currently, he is pursuing his Ph.D degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. His current research interests is on the dynamics of the flexible riser and mooring line in subsea.

Alyssa Novelia

Contact: a.novelia@berkeley.edu

Alyssa Novelia received her B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of California at Berkeley in 2012 and is currently pursuing M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the same institution. Currently, she is researching bioinspired locomotion and inverse-dynamics based models of SMA based soft robots. Her past research concerned the dynamics of the human eye. She is also one of the editors of rotations.berkeley.edu. Her interests are animations and any dynamical system with interesting geometric properties.

Undergraduate Students

Victor Le

Contact: victle@berkeley.edu

Victor is currently pursuing his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and expects to graduate in Spring of 2016. His research involves simulating the fluid dynamics of rowing oars, and his interests include biomechanical behavior, computational fluid dynamics, and modeling intricate systems. Victor has been a member of the Cal Band since his freshman year.

Previous Graduate Students

Miguel Christophy

M.S. 2010

Dynamics of the Human Spine

Personal Webpage

Joshua P. Coaplen

Motorcycle Navigation

David W. Gulick

Dynamics of the Dynabee

Wayne Huang

M.S. 2006

MEMS Strain Sensor Temperature Compensation

Avery J. Jutkowitz

M.S. 2003

Motorcycle Navigation and Dynamics

Eva A. Kanso

M.S. 1999

Rigid Body Contact

Patrick (Patch) Kessler

M.S. 2004 and Ph.D. 2007

Rigid Body Dynamics, Euler's Disk, Pseudospectra and Motorcycle Navigation

Personal Webpage

Nathan M. Kinkaid

M.S. 2001 and Ph.D. 2004

(Jointly advised with Prof. Panos Papadopoulos)

Contact Mechanics, Brake Squeal and Dynamics of Rods

Todd A. Lauderdale

M.S. 2002 and Ph.D. 2004

Dynamics of Rods, Material Symmetry and MEMS Resonator Design

Personal Webpage

David A. Moody

M.S. 2008 and Ph.D. 2011

Dynamics of the Human Spine

Personal Webpage

Ahrie H. Moon

Geometry of Contact

Thomas R. Nordenholz

M.S. 1995 and Ph.D. 1998

Continuum Mechanics, Cosserat Points and Rods

Jeun Jye Ong

M.S. 2003

Mechanics of Growing Bodies

Bayram Orazov

M.S. 2008 and Ph.D. 2011

Dynamics of Charles Taylor' One-Wheeled Vehicle, Dynamics of an Ocean Wave Energy Converter

Personal Webpage

Daniel M. Peters

M.S. 2008 and Ph.D. 2011

Dynamics of the Human Spine

Personal Webpage

Nur Adila Faruk Senan

M.S. 2008 and Ph.D. 2011

Plant Growth and Dynamics of the Human Spine

Personal Webpage

Benjamin L. Thoma

M.S. 2001

Deformable Satellite Dynamics

Timothy N. Tresierras

M.S. 2007 and Ph.D. 2009

Plant Growth and Dynamics of Rods

Personal Webpage

Jeffrey S. Turcotte

Ph.D. 1996

Approximate Theories of Rods and Vibrations of Rods

Peter C. Varadi

M.S. 1996 and Ph.D. 1999

Vehicle Dynamics, Cosserat Points, Stability of Elastic Rods, Dynamics of Shocks and Discontinuities

Personal Webpage

Xuance Zhou

Ph.D. 2015

Models and Analysis of Locomotion and Gripping in Soft Robots

Personal Webpage